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Pictured: Second Best of Breed GC, NW EMAU’S DANCIN INTHE DARK OF MAUTRIX, Smoke Egyptian Mau Male .Photo: © Chanan

The Egyptian Mau is a fascinating cat, not only because of its past history, but because of its delightful personality and striking appearance.The Mau (mau is the Egyptian word for cat) has been clearly identified in the artwork of the ancient Egyptians, leaving no question in the minds of many experts that the Egyptian Mau is indeed the cat domesticated from a spotted subspecies of the African Wild Cat by this unique culture. To gaze upon this beautiful and engaging creature is an opportunity to view a living relic.

The role of the Mau in the religion, mythology, and everyday life of the Egyptian conveys the degree of affection and respect in which these cats were held. They were worshipped as deities, cherished as pets, protected by laws, and mummified and mourned upon their death.

Their history in North America began with their importation in 1956 by the exiled Russian princess, Nathalie Troubetskoy. Recognition by The Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) for championship competition came in 1977. In the past, all Egyptian Maus in the U.S. and Canada traced their ancestry to two of the original imports from the Fatima Cattery. Recent importations have enriched and broadened the available gene pool for breeders.

The Egyptian Mau has the distinction of being the only natural spotted breed of domestic cat. An extremely intelligent animal, the Mau places a great importance on family, both human and their own, and is fiercely loyal in his devotion to them. They are moderately active and often express their happiness by chortling in a soft melodious voice and wiggling their tails at great speed while treading with their forepaws.

With an elegant body that is randomly spotted, banded legs and tail, expressive gooseberry green eyes, distinctive mascara lines, a worried expression on the face, and a graceful cheetah-like stride, it is no wonder that the Mau attracts such a tremendous amount of attention at cat shows.

The Egyptian Mau comes in three colors that can be shown in championship classes: Silver, Bronze, and Smoke. Also accepted for registration purposes, but not for showing, are the solid Black and the dilute versions of the “primary” colors: Blue Silver, Blue spotted (dilute bronze), Blue Smoke and the solid Blue. Although the black and the dilute Maus are not eligible for showing, they make excellent pets like all other Maus.

Pricing on Egyptian Maus usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National or Regional winning parentage (NW or RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: Dot Brocksom

Last Updated: Friday, June 12, 2009

Taken from: http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/egyptian.html

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Pictured: Third Best of Breed GC, RW DEVINEDEVONS BLUE BIT-A-HEAVEN, Blue Devon Rex Female .Photo: ©

In 1959, a Miss Cox of Devonshire England found that a stray cat in her care had given birth to a rather odd looking curly-haired kitten, the sire thought to be a curly-haired tomcat seen in the area. Delighted with the kitten’s elfin features and wavy curls, she named him Kirlee — the founding father of the unique and wonderful breed of cats known today as the Devon Rex. Today’s Devon Rex maintain a look true to their founder — huge ears, set low on the sides of the head frame, a pixie-like face with large, inquisitive eyes and a short slightly upturned nose. A coat of loose waves and curls covers a strong and supple body in a compact, refined form. These unusual features decorate a breed whose personality, intelligence, friendliness and inquisitive behavior are as unique as the package it comes in. A young breed, the Devon Rex is carefully crossbred to American and British Shorthairs in order to enlarge and strengthen the gene pool.

Nicely “mid-sized” cats, adult Devons average six to nine pounds, with males heavier than females. While an even, full coat of loose curls is ideal for the show ring, the Devon coat varies greatly between individuals, ranging from an almost shaggy mop of loose curls in some to a thin suede-like coat in others that may leave some areas nearly bare. The coat may vary over the life of the cat, with some kittens dropping much of their coat (“molting”) during their development, and some adult coats changing seasonally. Even though their body temperature is the same as other cats, many Devons are surprisingly warm to the touch due to a lighter, less insulating coat. Not surprisingly, Devons tend to be “heat seekers,” and are often found lounging on televisions, computer monitors and heater vents. On chilly nights, Devons make superb bed warmers, often sneaking under the covers to stay warm and share body heat with their favorite people.

The Devon personality has been aptly described as a cross between a cat, a monkey, and “Dennis the Menace.” Devons are highly active, playful and involved with everything. Powerful jumpers, very few spots large enough to hold them will not be explored and occupied. Devons have been found climbing brick fireplaces and perching on top of doors. Although little escapes a Devon’s interest, Devons are very people-oriented. Most Devons invite themselves along for every activity — preferably perched on a shoulder, lap, or wherever they can be closest to their people. They are accomplished food mooches, with “anything they aren’t supposed to be into” only slightly less appealing than “anything you are eating.” Many a bag of snack food left unattended for an eyeblink has suddenly sprouted two legs and a tail, with a Devon contentedly grazing inside.

Devons are low maintenance, wash-and-wear companions. Their large ears occasionally require cleaning, but otherwise a quick shampoo and towel dry (or even a wipedown with a damp cloth) and a nail-trim is all the grooming most Devons require. Despite popular myth, Devons do shed (as does anything with hair), although their unique coat may make the shed hair less obtrusive than that of many cats. Devons have also gained a dubious reputation as being “hypo-allergenic,” but this varies according to an individual’s personal allergies. While some people with animal allergies tolerate Devons very well, anyone with allergy issues should arrange to handle a Devon before considering acquiring one.

Pricing on Devon Rex usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National, National Breed and/or Regional winning parentage (NW, BW, RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life. Colors: a wide array of colors in the solid, shaded, smoke, tabby, bi-color, parti-color and pointed patterns.

Text: Chuck Lawson
Last Updated: Thursday, June 11, 2009

Taken from:http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/devon.html

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Pictured: Second Best of Breed GC, RW DREAMSONG TSUNAMI, Blue Cornish Rex Female
Photo: © Blue Bayou

“Are those cats from outer space?!” No, Cornish Rex cats are not from outer space and, in spite of their resemblance to ancient Egyptian statues, they are not from Egypt either. As their name implies, these cats originated in Cornwall, England, where they first appeared in a litter of barn cats born about 1950.

In appearance, Cornish Rex cats are a study in curves starting most noticeably with their coat which ideally falls in washboard waves. The coat is very short, lies close to the body and is incredibly soft to the touch, prompting comparisons to cut velvet, karakul lamb, rabbit fur or silk. In fact, it feels like a Cornish Rex coat and nothing else is the same. There is even variation among individuals within the breed.

In addition to the coat, this breed has a distinct head and body type. Large ears are set high on a comparatively small, egg-shaped head with high cheekbones, hollow cheeks, and a high-bridged Roman nose and strong chin. The body has been compared to a Whippet dog’s because of its arched back, barrel chest, small waist and very long, fine legs. In spite of their dainty appearance, these small to medium sized cats are extremely hard-bodied and muscular, using their well developed hips and long legs for fast starts and stops, quick turns and high jumps.

In personality, the Cornish Rex is extremely affectionate and people-oriented. They are also active cats whose kitten-like antics last for their lifetime and who can be very inventive in their play. Favorite Cornish Rex games are fetch, catch and even “discus,” in which the cat uses its hand-like paw to pick up and toss a small object. In spite of their sophisticated, elegant appearance, Cornish Rex cats are anything but cool, aloof or dignified. They are perfect pets for the owner who wants active cats to participate in family life.

Because of their extremely short, fine textured coat, many people have the impression that the Cornish Rex does not shed and is hypoallergenic. This is not strictly true. All animals are constantly renewing their coats as old hairs are replaced by new ones. While Cornish Rex hairs are not easy to find lying on the furniture, they are there and owners will find them in the dryer filter and clinging to some fabrics. Certainly, by comparison to some other cats, the shedding is minimal. Even so, most allergic people are bothered by the dander (dead skin cells) and the saliva, both of which are present in Cornish Rex cats. Policies concerning allergy sales vary from breeder to breeder and potential buyers should realize each breeder does what he or she feels is in the cats’ best interest.

Pricing on Cornish Rex depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National or Regional winning parentage (NW or RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: Catherine Ash

Last Updated: Thursday, June 11, 2009

Taken from:http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/cornish.html

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Pictured: Third Best of Breed GC, RW CAPRIOLE LUCQUES, Seal-Lynx Point Colorpoint Shorthair Male .Photo: © Chanan

Colorpoint Shorthairs are the first cousins of the Siamese. This breed is distinguished by its elegance in sixteen different “point” colors beyond the four Siamese colors. Half-siblings to the Siamese by virtue of their foundation and continuing breeding with the Siamese, the Colorpoint Shorthair is a hybrid breed of the Siamese. Colorpoints, circa 1947-48, are a far cry from their angular, leggy descendants of today. Today’s Colorpoints are the same structural standard of the Siamese, with the only difference being their unique point colors.

In the early breedings, breeders concentrated on cats with red or cream restricted to the points (face, legs, ears, tails and genitals). Early hybridizations with domestic shorthairs, and refinement by concentrating the Siamese gene with the red gene, produced the first of the colors to eventually be called Colorpoint Shorthairs. To distinguish the new breed from the Siamese, CFA breeders adopted the name Colorpoint Shorthair for registration purposes, and through a painstaking process won recognition as a breed in 1964. The early cats who helped become the new breed were given the first color class of the Colorpoints, called the solid points, which are the red and cream points.

As time progressed and the early hybrids gained popularity, the tabby versions of the Siamese were introduced into the Colorpoint Shorthair programs in the four Siamese colors. In CFA, these tabby pointed cats are called lynx points and are exhibited in their own “lynx point class” as seal-lynx points, chocolatelynx points, blue-lynx points, lilac-lynx points, red-lynx points and cream-lynx points.

The tortie, or parti-colors, are an interesting phenomenon of the hybridization process of the red gene. Shortened to “tortie or cream points,” this color class of the Colorpoint Shorthairs are exhibited as the parti-colors. They are memorable representatives of the breed because of their loving yet independent attitudes. The parti-colors are a “by product” of the red gene and come in the four Siamese colors with random mottling or “blotching” of red and/or cream with the basic Siamese color. They often also have what is called a “blaze,” a symmetrical split of the red and/or cream on one side of the face mask and the Siamese color, such as seal, on the other half. Indeed, this is a very striking appearance. Because the red color gene is sex linked, tortie or cream parti-color points only come in females. Color descriptions start with the primary Siamese color and add the mottling of red or cream. Thus we have the seal-tortie points, chocolate-tortie points, blue-cream points and lilac-cream points. When bred to a lynx parent, the last four of the sixteen colors are the tabby, or lynx, versions of the parti-color points, i.e. the seal-tortie lynx point, chocolate-tortie lynx point, blue-cream lynx point and lilac-cream lynx point.

Like their Siamese cousins, Colorpoint Shorthairs require little grooming and are especially good in households with allergies to cats since both breeds have little dander. An occasional bath is recommended, but allow the freshly bathed coat to air dry in a warm spot. Do not blow dry, but do brush the coat with the concave or short side of a small rubber brush to remove loose hair and make the coat lie smooth. The coat can be “finished” by smoothing the coat with a chamois cloth. Balanced diets high in protein are generally recommended, since part of the natural beauty of the Colorpoints is their glistening, muscular hard tubular bodies. Heed the instructions of your cat’s breeder when you acquire your Colorpoint Shorthair, and you will be blessed with a long-lived joyous companion.

Pricing on Colorpoint Shorthairs usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National, National Breed and/or Regional winning parentage (NW, BW, RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: Bernie Hartman

Last Updated: Monday, August 10, 2009

Taken from: http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/colorpoint.html

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Pictured: Second Best of Breed GC, RW CHARLEVAL’S BRAVO OF FIORIRE, Chartreux Male .Photo: © Chanan

The Chartreux may be one of The Cat Fanciers’ Association’s oldest new breeds. Chartreux history is steeped in legend, even though the breed was only advanced to championship status in 1987. There exists a lovely old legend that the Chartreux lived with, and were named for, the Carthusian monks of France, and perhaps even shared a tipple or two of their famous Chartreuse liqueur! Recent research, however, indicates that because of the woolly character of their fur, they were given the same name as a well known Spanish wool of the early 18th century. Since this method of naming is common in animal husbandry, it is very likely the truth. Nevertheless, the presence of this natural breed of cat was noted in documents as early as the 16th century, and was acknowledged for its unique coat texture and color. Whatever the reason, the Chartreux adopted France with all their native vitality and intelligence, and the country adopted the breed.

The Chartreux is a study in contrasts. Often described as a “potato on toothpicks,” the Chartreux has a robust body, broad shoulders and a deep chest, all complemented by medium short, finely boned legs. The Chartreux is well muscled, which would enable the cat to meet its obligation as the fine mouser it is reputed to be in French literature. Unlike any other cat, the Chartreux’s blue fur is medium in length and woolly, with the proper coat breaking at the neck, chest, and flanks. A dense undercoat gives it resistance and a feeling of sheep’s wool.

The Chartreux is known for its smile. The rounded head with its softly contoured forehead tapers to a narrowed muzzle. This gives the Chartreux an image of smiling. The nose is straight with a slight stop at eye level. The Chartreux’s eyes are one of its most endearing features. They are rounded, but not as round as the Persian’s. The outer corners curve slightly upward. Color ranges from gold to copper, the latter being most preferred by breeders. The ears should be medium in height and width, set high and erect on the head. Most importantly, the Chartreux should enjoy or at least tolerate being handled for exhibition.

Chartreux quickly become attached to one family and frequently follow their masters from room to room. Known for their dog-like behavior, these cats can be taught to fetch a ball, and most will respond to their names. By tradition, all kittens born in a given year are named beginning with a specific letter of the alphabet for that particular year. Breeders use only 20 letters, omitting K, Q, W, X, Y and Z. The Chartreux is a quiet breed, chirping rather than meowing at things it finds interesting. This intelligent cat is fascinated by television and likes to participate in telephone conversations by chewing on the cord.

Chartreux kittens are precocious. Physical maturity can be three years in coming, with a scraggly stage between kitten and adulthood that puts one in mind of a gawky, adolescent youngster. Then, almost overnight, they put it all together, with stunning results. Environment and attention have everything to do with this breed’s adult manners and behavior. Brushing the double coat is a no-no. Instead, running your fingers through the fur on a daily basis will suffice and will also contribute to your cat’s social demeanor at the same time.

Chartreux kittens are generally available by reservation only inasmuch as the breed is zealously protected by its breeders and demand for these endearing cats outstrips availability. During World War II, some French breeders tried to save the breed from extinction by outcrossing to Persians and British Shorthairs. However, the original Chartreux cats that were imported to the United States came from the French countryside, and only those cats were used in breeding programs to produce and preserve the natural status of the present pedigreed Chartreux. This lovely breed was brought to the United States through the efforts of John and Helen Gamon who were committed to finding and acquiring the beautiful cats. Today, many American-bred Chartreux are being returned to French breeders, thus reducing even further their availability in the United States.

Pricing on Chartreux usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National, National Breed and/or Regional winning parentage (NW, BW, RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: Mary Ann Sweeters

Last Updated: Thursday, June 11, 2009

Taken from:http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/chartreux.html

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Pictured: Second Best of Breed GC GRAY MARK’S AGATE OF BURMA PEARL, Sable Burmese – Sable Division Female . Photo: © Chanan

In the early 1930’s, Dr. Joseph Thompson of San Francisco acquired an attractive walnut-brown female from Burma which he named Wong Mau. Through selective breeding to Siamese, it was established that the Burmese is a distinct breed. Lighter colored kittens were occasionally produced and eventually the American breeders requested recognition from CFA for these “dilute” colors; first, as another breed named Malayan, then later as a dilute division of Burmese. The four colors recognized by CFA are: sable, champagne, blue and platinum.

Burmese carry surprising weight for their size and have often been described as “bricks wrapped in silk.” Their coats are very short, satin-like in texture, and generally require little grooming other than daily petting. There is a range in Burmese head and body type; the more compact cats with the rounder heads are seen in the show ring. Burmese have large, expressive eyes that are great pools of innocence and seductive appeal, irresistible in effect. These eyes are their most persuasive weapon in an arsenal of endearing traits that mask an awesome power to hypnotize their owners into life-time love affairs through which they effortlessly rule their families.

As kittens, Burmese are quite lively. They often seem clumsy when they attempt feats beyond their capabilities and land on their rears with solid little thumps. They will be playful well into adulthood. As Burmese grow, their high intelligence emerges and their own individual personalities start to unfold. They mature into charming, resolute executives who move in and take over a household, running it efficiently with those big eyes and a velvet paw. If encouraged, many Burmese converse with their humans, using soft, sweet voices (they are neither loud nor raucous). They are good with children, will tolerate the family dog, and if introduced to it at an early age as something pleasant, most will enjoy traveling in a car.

Burmese are extremely people-oriented; their personalities are almost dog-like in a tendency to shadow their owners and in a desire to give and receive affection. Many Burmese have delighted their “humans” by learning to retrieve. They love warm laps and caressing hands and enjoy cuddling up in bed either under the covers or on top of their favorite persons. They delight in helping to manage the house. Some of their favorite chores are assisting with paper work or reading (by sitting on top of the material), or going into cupboards (to demonstrate where things ought to be). Typically, Burmese are always with people. The females tend to request center stage and take an active role in ruling the household. The males prefer to supervise from the lap position, are more laid back and less opinionated. If emotionally slighted by their owner’s obtuseness, Burmese may sulk, but, fortunately, not for long. Burmese often convert the most anti-cat person into a Burmese enthusiast. Be forewarned! They can be addictive, and like potato chips, you may find you cannot have just one. Many people find the complete Burmese experience is to have one of each sex or perhaps two (or more) colors.

Burmese should never be let outdoors as they are entirely too trusting and have little, if any, survival instinct. Their idea of survival is to turn their soulful eyes on you to attend to all their needs. This does not work for catching food, fighting off enemies or avoiding cars.

A Burmese should be purchased only from a reputable breeder; avoid pet shops. It is advisable to visit the breeder’s home to observe the conditions in which the litter is being raised. While breeders differ in their methods, the environment should be clean and relatively odorless. The kittens should be energetic, curious, and easily handled. They should also appear healthy, as should all the cats in the breeder’s home. Check for clear eyes and noses, clean ears and healthy-looking coats. A breeder should guarantee the health of the kitten or cat for a reasonable length of time, provide registration papers (often after the kitten has been altered), discuss care, and be available to answer questions.

Pricing on Burmese usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National or Regional winning parentage (NW or RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: Judith Kollman and Patricia Swihart

Last Updated: Thursday, June 11, 2009

Taken from: http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/burmese.html

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Pictured: Third Best of Breed GC, RW POTTERKATZ HAGRID OF CASTLKATZ, Cream Spotted Tabby British Shorthair Male . Photo: © Chanan

The British Shorthair, probably the oldest English breed of cat, traces its ancestry back to the domestic cat of Rome. This breed was first prized for its physical strength and hunting ability, but soon became equally recognized and valued for its calm demeanor, endurance and loyalty to man.

The British Shorthair is a comparatively rare cat in the United States. Around 1980 it was recognized for championship competition by CFA stimulating much needed interest in the breed. Recognized world-wide, many fine “Brits” are still imported today from England, Ireland, New Zealand and Australia to help widen the gene pool for breeders in the United States.

The British Shorthair is gaining in popularity every year as it is bred and exhibited by an increasing number of enthusiastic fanciers. Because of its easy-going nature and intelligence, it has become a favorite of animal trainers, for use in Hollywood films and television commercials. The British Shorthair has a short plush coat with a luxurious feel which is very easy to groom. A British Shorthair is always in quiet control of his or her environment, supervising everyone and everything that happens in the family. A larger sized cat that prefers to be on the ground, Brits are not known for acrobatics or speed. However, they are steadfast companions to the entire family and definitely look before they leap. When gracelessness is observed, the British Shorthair is duly embarrassed; quickly recovering with a “Cheshire Cat smile.”

Although first known as the British Blue, due to the breed’s original color, its native country incorporated a wide variety of colors under the term British Shorthair in the 1950’s. CFA also now recognizes the British Shorthair in many different colors and patterns.

Pricing on British Shorthairs usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National or Regional winning parentage (NW or RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: Karen Noble
Last Updated: Thursday, June 11, 2009

Taken from: http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/british.html

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Pictured: Second Best of Breed GC, RW CARICATURE’S MISSY ELLIOTT, Bombay Female .Photo: © Tetsu

This oft heard comment piqued the imagination of a prominent cat breeder, the late Nikki Horner, from Louisville, Kentucky. Ms. Horner set her sights on producing a copper-eyed black shorthaired cat with the exotic appearance of a “mini”, or “parlor-panther.” The black leopard of India inspired her choice of the breed’s name. Ms. Horner began her effort in 1953 with the selection of a black American Shorthair male with deep copper eye color and a Grand Champion sable Burmese female. Through a long process of inbreeding and outcrossing and careful selection, she was able to consistently produce a black cat unlike any other.

The Bombay achieved CFA Championship status in 1976, eighteen years after it was created. Outcrossing to Black American Shorthairs and sable Burmese is still allowed. It has been said that if you want a dog, a cat, or a monkey, you want a Bombay. Bombays can often be leash trained, most enjoy playing “fetch,” and all are fond of inventing new ways to entertain themselves and the folks that live with them. Bombays are congenial and outgoing, and make intelligent, affectionate companions. They do well with children and will often act as a “greeter” with visitors. They live compatibly with dogs and other pets as well. The Bombay generally combines the easy-going temperament and robust nature of the American Shorthair and the social, inquisitive, lap-loving character of the Burmese.

With the exception of color, the Bombay and Burmese standards are very similar. Whereas the Burmese body presents a compact sturdy appearance, the Bombay body is of medium length, neither compact nor rangy, presenting a more lithesome appearance then its Burmese cousin. The Bombay’s head is rounded with a short muzzle, but there should not be a “pugged” or “snubbed” look. The coat is the most defining characteristic of the Bombay. Its short, flat, gleaming, black-to-the-roots coat accentuates its rippling muscular form. And, along with its conspicuous gold to copper eye color, leads to the Bombay being described as the “Patent leather kid with the copper penny eyes.”

Pricing on Bombays usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National, National Breed and/or Regional winning parentage (NW, BW, RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: Joyce M. Carlisle (with modifications by Sigfrid Hauck)
Last Updated: Thursday, June 11, 2009

Taken from:http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/bombay.html

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Pictured: Third Best of Breed GC, RW ADORABIR EPITOME, Seal Point Birman Male .Photo: ©

The Birman cat is believed to have originated in Burma, where it was considered sacred, the companion cat of the Kittah priests. There is a legend as to how the Birmans developed the colors they are today: “Originally, the guardians of the Temple of LaoTsun were yellow-eyed white cats with long hair. The golden goddess of the temple, Tsun-Kyan-Kse, had deep blue eyes. The head priest, Mun-Ha, had as his companion a beautiful cat named Sinh. One day the temple was attacked and Mun-Ha was killed. At the moment of his death, Sinh placed his feet on his master and faced the goddess. The cat’s white fur took on a golden cast, his eyes turned as blue as the eyes of the goddess, and his face, legs and tail became the color of earth. However, his paws, where they touched the priest, remained white as a symbol of purity. All the other temple cats became similarly colored. Seven days later, Sinh died, taking the soul of Mun-Ha to paradise.”

The modern history of the Birman is almost as shrouded in mystery as its legendary origin. What is known for certain is that, probably around 1919, a pair of Birman cats were clandestinely shipped from Burma to France. The male cat did not survive the arduous conditions of the long voyage, but the female, Sita, did survive, and happily, was pregnant.

The ideal Birman is a large, long stocky cat. It has long silky hair, not as thick as that of the Persian, and is of a texture that doesn’t mat. The color of the coat is light, preferably with a golden cast, as if misted with gold. The “points” – face, legs and tail – are darker, similar to the Siamese and colorpointed Persian color patterns of seal point, blue point, chocolate point and lilac point. The almost round eyes are blue, set in a strong face with heavy jaws, full chin and Roman nose with nostrils set low. The very distinctive white feet are ideally symmetrical. The gloves on the front feet, if perfect, go across in an even line, and on the back feet end in a point up the back of the leg, called laces. It is very difficult to breed a cat with four perfect white gloves.From this small foundation the Birman was established in the western world. The French cat registry recognized the Birman as a separate breed in 1925. By the end of WW II, only two Birmans were left alive in Europe, and a program of outcrossing was necessary to reestablish the breed. Most cat registries require at least five generations of pure breeding after outcrossings to fully accredit a breed for championship competition. Birmans were recognized by England in 1966 and by The Cat Fanciers’ Association in 1967.

The Birman personality is marvelous – gentle, active, playful, but quiet and unobtrusive if you are busy with other things.

Pricing on Birmans usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National or Regional winning parentage (NW or RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: Sacred Cat of Burma Fanciers and Hildegard Schone.
Last Updated: Last Updated: Thursday, June 11, 2009

Taken from: http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/birman.html

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Pictured: Second Best of Breed GC CLOWNTOWN’S ALERT TOO, Lilac Point Balinese Male . Photo: © Chanan

What’s so great about a Balinese cat? Everything! Ask anyone who is owned by one of these fabulous felines what is so special about the breed, and you set off a glowing monologue that ends only when the speaker is exhausted. Under that long, silky ermine coat he wears so proudly, this beautiful cat is all Siamese, and that includes his personality. Despite his regal bearing and aristocratic appearance, he is a clown with a heart as big as a circus tent. To gauge the level of his intelligence, you have only to gaze into those sapphire eyes which sparkle with alertness and healthy curiosity. Although he is every bit as demonstrative and affectionate as the Siamese, he is somewhat less vocal and his voice is softer. Grooming is simple, for the coat does not mat like the double coat of most longhaired breeds.

It is generally accepted that the breed originated as a spontaneous longhaired mutation of the Siamese cat. Apparently, Mother Nature decided that the already glorious Siamese could be made even more glorious by adding the long flowing coat to the svelte body lines of this graceful oriental beauty. Coat length is the only difference between the Siamese and the Balinese.

The breed standard of The Cat Fanciers’ Association describes the Balinese as a svelte, dainty cat with long tapering lines, very lithe but muscular. Like its ancestor breed, the Siamese, nearly everything about the Balinese is l-o-n-g, including body, head, legs, and tail. It goes one step further than the Siamese in that its coat is also long. The most distinctive feature of the Balinese is its luxurious tail plume.Although it is probable that occasional longhaired kittens had been turning up in pedigreed Siamese litters long before they attracted the interest of a few imaginative breeders, no serious effort was made to promote the longhairs as a new breed until the 1940’s.

Because the Balinese has a single coat, in contrast to the double coat of other longhairs, the hair lies close to the body, flowing naturally toward the rear. Thus, it does not detract from the long, slim, lines of the basic body structure.

The only point colors recognized by CFA are the same colors recognized in the pedigreed Siamese: seal point, blue point, chocolate point and lilac point.Pricing on Balinese usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National or Regional winning parentage (NW or RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: Continental Balinese Club
Last Updated: Monday, August 04, 2003

Taken from:http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/balinese.html

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