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Pictured: Second Best of Breed GC, RW KT OF KC FAT BOY, Brown Mac Tabby-White Manx – Longhair Division Male .Photo: © Preston Smith Photography

The Manx cat is believed to have originated hundreds of years ago on the Isle of Man, off the coast of England. Since many trade ships docked on the Isle, and all had ship cats, it is hard to tell just what the parent cat really was. Obviously, both longhair and shorthair were represented in the original mutation. Many longhairs were seen on the Isle along with the shorthairs. Records have been found on the Isle of Man that describe the cat as a mutation of the island’s domestic cats. It is believed that the island cats were involved, however, did some of the island cats come off the ships? We will never really know.

CFA has recognized the Manx as a breed for many years. The oldest stud book on hand, Vol. #19, list Manx as one of the breeds that CFA recognized back in the 1920s. Since the Manx (or tailless) gene is dominant, kittens that inherit it can have a full tail, a short tail, a rise (known as a “rumpy riser”), or no tail (“rumpies”) at all. Breeders have found that it is possible to have all these tail lengths in one litter! Only the rumpy or the rumpy riser are eligible for competition in the championship category at CFA shows. All other tail lengths are eligible for the AOV (any other variety) Class. Many of today’s top breeding females are those that had a long tail when born. Numerous Grand Champions have come from a tailed cat, either male or female. The introduction of a tailed Manx into a breeding program provides a necessary sturdiness.

Besides taillessness, the Manx is known for its robust and rounded appearance. This breed can actually be drawn with a series of circles! It has a very round head and rounded cheeks which give it a jowly appearance; even more so in the male cat than in the female. It is high in the hind quarters with the back legs much longer than the forelegs, thus causing the rump to be higher than the shoulders. The shortness of back forms a continuous arch from shoulders to rump. The eyes are rounded but set at a slight tilt toward the ear. The Manx should have a sweet expression.

There are two types of Manx coats, shorthair and longhair (formerly Cymric). The coat length is the only difference between the longhair and shorthair Manx. The shorthair has a double coat, the outer guardhairs are somewhat hard, appearance is glossy. A softer coat may occur in whites and dilutes due to color texture gene link. The longhair has a silky texture to its coat. The coat will be of medium length, with breeches, abdomen and neck ruff being longer than the coat on the main body. The silky texture is soft, and falls smoothly on the body yet being full and plush due to the double coat.

The Manx is a very playful cat as a rule. They can jump higher than anyone could imagine, and it is not unusual to find them perching on the highest point in any room. They have extremely powerful hind quarters. It has been stated by one Manx owner that “Manx are the feline sport cars of the car world with their acceleration and quick turns.” Manx exhibit many dog-like characteristics such as retrieving and burying their toys. They will either be known as a “one person cat” or the “family cat.” However, once they bond with someone, it is difficult for many Manx to be happy in a different home. On the other hand, there are those Manx that readily accept attention from any human source!

Pricing on Manx usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National or Regional winning parentage (NW or RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Taken from: http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/manx.html

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Pictured: Second Best of Breed GC, RW TEXAS BELLE BILLY BOB, Van Black-White Maine Coon Male .Photo: © Blue Bayou

Myths, legend and lore surround the Maine Coon Cat. Some are amusing, some are fantastic flights of fantasy and some are merely plausible. They certainly provide good material for conversation. Books and articles dealing with these aspects of the Maine Coon Cat have been well received as people never seem to tire of the subject and are always eager to know more about this wonderful breed.

The Maine Coon is the native American longhaired cat and was recognized as a specific breed in Maine where they were held in high regard for their mousing talents. Through nature’s own breeding program, this breed has developed into a sturdy cat ideally suited to the harsh winters and varied seasons of the region. The Maine Coon is well known for its loving nature, kindly disposition and great intelligence. Maines are especially good with children and dogs and have always been a popular and sought after companion.

The Maine Coon has always been admired for its beauty, and a Maine Coon was chosen Best Cat at the first major cat show ever held in this country. The transition from easygoing farm cat to CFA finalist was not an easy one, nor did it happen quickly. Although they lost favor and were conspicuously absent from shows for quite a long time, we are now seeing large classes of these beauties in most cat shows and it is not unusual for a Maine Coon to be named “Best Cat.”

Pricing on Maine Coons usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National or Regional winning parentage (NW or RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: Sonya Stanislow, reprinted in part from the 1985 CFA Yearbook.

Last Updated: Friday, June 12, 2009

Taken from: http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/maine.html

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Pictured: Best of Breed CH, BW PATSI-KAT HIGH PLAINS DRIFTER, Brown Tabby-White Laperm – Shorthair Division Male . Photo: © Blue Bayou

The LaPerm is a unique combination of curly hair and an affectionate personality. One cannot deny the love and affection a LaPerm will shower upon its owner nor the curly or wavy hair that also makes the breed so interesting.

The kitten that exhibited traits of the original mutation that has formed the basis for the LaPerm breed sprang from strong, healthy, domestic “barn-cat” stock. In 1982, on an Oregon farm located near the ancient hunting and fishing grounds of the Wishram Indians, a litter of six kittens was born to a barn cat. One of the kittens was born completely bald — looking nothing like her mother or her littermates. While the kitten had no hair, it did have large wide-spaced ears and a blueprint pattern on her skin that mimicked a classic tabby pattern. Within eight weeks the kitten began to grow very soft, curly hair. At three to four months of age the kitten, now named “Curly,” had a full coat of curly hair. Not being very knowledgeable about cats, the owner accepted the “mutant” as unique and thought nothing more of the matter.

During the next 10 years no attempt was made to breed selectively but as the frequency of bald kittens increased in the random bred litters, the owner of the farm began to seek additional information about her unusual cats. She had no knowledge of genetics or breeding and thus allowed the cats to roam freely throughout the barns and orchard for several years. As she became aware of how truly unique these cats were, she started to confine the cats and control the breedings. It appeared that the curly gene was dominant and carried by both males and females. This breeder was totally unprepared for the interest and excitement generated by cats she decided to enter in a cat show. The owner gave the cats the breed name “LaPerm,” which means wavy or rippled.

The LaPerm can sport anything from a wavy coat to ringlet-type curls that range from tight ringlets to long corkscrew curls. The tightest curls occur on the underside of the cat, on the throat area and at the base of the ears. The longhair is generally blessed with a curly plumed tail and often exhibits a full, curly ruff. The coat is moderately soft in texture, yet each cat’s coat is distinctly unique. The shorthair has more texture to the coat than does the longhaired variety. It does not have the ruff, has a “bottle-brush” type tail and the coat generally stands away from the body, parting down the middle.

The LaPerm comes in every recognized color and coat pattern. Some kittens can be born hairless, but most have short wavy hair or straight hair at birth. Kittens often go almost totally bald beginning with a spot on the tops of their heads. This process generally starts when the kittens are about two weeks old and they can be in varying stages of baldness during their first four months or so. The coat will generally come back in and will always be curly if the kitten was born curly. Coat variations throughout the life of a LaPerm range from molting that can leave a sparse, thin coat for life to a possible full coat after neutering or spaying.

LaPerms are gentle and affectionate but also very active. Unlike many active breeds, the LaPerm is also quite content to be a lap cat. The LaPerm will often follow your lead, that is if they are busy playing and you decide to sit and relax, simply pick up your LaPerm and sit down with it and it will stay on your lap devouring the attention you give it. LaPerms seek human contact and will purr as soon as they become aware of your presence. They are inquisitive by nature and always want to know what is going on around them. They will reach for your face with their paws and rub their faces against your head, neck and face.

LaPerms are truly different from any other breed of cat because of their unique combination of appearance and people oriented personalities. The breed has captivated nearly everyone who has the opportunity of seeing one. Once a LaPerm graces your household you will be hard pressed to think of living with any other breed and may find it a necessity to have more than one. Cradling a LaPerm in your arms can touch your senses. Running your fingers through the sensuous coat becomes automatic and you won’t want to stop. Listening to the purr and seeing the intelligence unfold as you teach your cat tricks such as fetching will give you an unmatched feeling of love and respect for the breed.

Pricing on LaPerms usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National, National Breed and/or Regional winning parentage (NW, BW, RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: A.D. Lawrence
Last Updated: Monday, June 22, 2009

Taken from: http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/laperm.html

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Pictured: Third Best of Breed GC MOWL SIMA’S TOTALLY PHAT, Korat Female
Photo: ©

“The eyes of the Korat are like those of no other cat; expressive and oversized for the face with a depth and intense gaze that takes your breath away…as sparkling as the ‘dewdrops on a lotus leaf.’ ” Like all newborn kittens at first the eyes are blue, changing to amber with a green tinge around the pupil during adolescence. Then, when the cat reaches approximately two to four years of age, the eyes are luminous green.

Korats have extraordinary powers of hearing, sight and scent. They are gentle pets, moving softly and cautiously, disliking sudden, loud or harsh noises. Those destined to be shown must be trained from birth to accept noise and handling, possibly by keeping a radio on in the nursery, and by lifting and posing the kitten as judges do. Korats form an exceptionally strong bond of affection with their owners and respond warmly to cuddling, setting as close as possible. They mix well with other cats but tend to want to have the upper hand and will not let the others keep them from their rightful place at their owner’s side. They have been cherished for centuries in their native Thailand and they naturally expect this tradition to be maintained wherever they go. Korats are active in their play, but are very gentle with children.

Their hair does not float off when they are being stroked and petted, so many people with an allergy to cat hair find their proximity tolerable. The roots of the hair are a light bluish color, darkening before the ends become silver-tipped. This silvering over the whole body should make a halo, or aura, effect and the close lying fur shines like a polished silver dollar.

They are considered a symbol of good fortune by the Thais. Many good luck traditions surround the Korat: they are the color of silver, signifying wealth; they are the color of rain clouds, with eyes the color of young rice, meaning good crops. The gift of a pair of Si-Sawat cats to the bride ensures a fortunate marriage.

The earliest known picture of a Korat, or Si-Sawat, cat is to be found in the ancient book of paintings and verses known asThe Cat-Book Poems in Bangkok’s National Library. It is believed by the Fine Arts Department, a division of Thailand’s Ministry of Education, to have been produced some time during the Ayudhya Period of Siamese History (1350-1767).

A high-ranking monk, Somdej Phra Buddhacharn Buddhasarmahathera, was commissioned by King Rama V (1869-1910) to copy The Cat-Book Poems on special Khoi paper. Known as theSmud Khoi of Cats, it hangs in a high glass case in the Minor Arts Room of Bangkok’s National Museum. Books were folded, not bound as is a more recent version, known as The Book of the Cat, also in the National Museum, which is apparently a twentieth century version of the cats and their accompanying verses. This shows seventeen cats, whose ownership brings good fortune and six with boding of the very reverse. Among the Good Luck cats is the Korat.

King Rama V is said to have named the breed when he remarked, “What a pretty cat – where is it from?” and was told “Korat.” Presently in Thailand the Korats are generally referred to as the Si-Sawat cats (see-sah-waht) and are found in other provinces as well. There’s no changing the color of the breed. Korats are silver-blue from their first day until their last; a cat of any other color is not a Korat. Their coats are soft and close-lying, with each blue hair tipped with silver.

In 1959, the first known pair of Korats (Nara and Darra), were imported into the United States. The Korats were accepted for competition in CFA in the championship category in 1966.

Pricing on Korats usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National or Regional winning parentage (NW or RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: In part with permission from “The Korat Story” by Daphne Negus
Last Updated: Friday, June 12, 2009

Taken from: http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/korat.html

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Pictured: Third Best of Breed Third Best of Breed GC MADRIGAL’S SUPER JET PUFFPUFF, Seal-Lynx Point Balinese – Javanese Division Female
Photo: © Pttemple Photo

Take one Balinese, dip in the colors of the rainbow and you have a Javanese. The Javanese is everything that is Balinese, and then some…the intelligence, grace and refinement of the Siamese, the luxurious silk of the Balinese coat, combined with the designer colors of the Colorpoint Shorthair. Named for the next island over from Bali, Javanese have been around for about as long as the Balinese. Some appeared in litters of Colorpoint Shorthairs, most likely a result of the longhair gene being introduced via the domestic shorthair when the red, lynx and tortie point colors and patterns were first introduced to the Siamese breed. Most are the result of Balinese breeders using the Colorpoint Shorthair to introduce these colors and patterns into the Balinese breed. The Javanese were finally accepted by CFA for championship competition as of May 1986. The Javanse standard is identical to that of the Balinese – a cat of Siamese type with long flowing coat, the only difference being in the colors accepted for championship competition.

The Javanese is a breed for folks who want a little spice in their lives. A study of contradictions – elegant refinement, sometimes fragile in appearance…in reality hard and muscular with surprising strength. The slender lines and flowing coat hide a rock hard body capable of amazing feats of acrobatic proportions. Highly intelligent, they become familiar with their human’s routine. They will “talk,” gently reminding when you are late with meals or play time, joyously greeting you whenever you have been away. As a rule, the Javanese voice is softer and gentler than the Siamese. They use their paws like little hands to open cabinets and drawers in search of a favorite toy they saw you hide. Many “fetch,” but never delude yourself that you taught them this game. In reality, they have cleverly taught you how to throw. Easy to care for, their coats never mat and tend to shed less than the Siamese or Colorpoints, truly a “lazy man’s longhair” – an occasional combing and bath to refresh the sensuous silky texture of their coat is all that is necessary outside of regular nail clipping.

While the Balinese might have specific personalities linked to each color, the Javanese most definitely do! Tortie points are an acquired taste, you either like them or you don’t. Their markings can vary from a soft sprinkling of red and cream on a background of seal, blue, chocolate or lilac, to bold splashes of color, sometimes creating a clown-like appearance. Tortie points are the Javanese version of a dizzy blond or crazy redhead acting almost as if, between the splashes of red and cream mixed with the background color, they can’t make up their minds how they are supposed to behave. They “speak” their minds freely and entertain you with their antics. If Lucille Ball was ever reincarnated as a cat, she would definitely be a tortie!

Red and cream points must get their color from Cupid’s arrow — this has to be the most laid back and easy going of all colors. They seem to exist only to love you. While they love to play and do the same things that “normal” cats do, they take frequent breaks to reassure you of their devotion. They need to feel a part of your life and love to “help,” offering suggestions from a short distance before moving in to assist you with the project in question.

Lynx points seem to be the most popular pattern. There is nothing quite so dramatic as silvery stripes on a seal point background. Lynx points also come in blue, chocolate, lilac, red and cream point colors along with all possible tortie point colors. Lynx point personalities seem to vary between the very regal and dignified to those that seem to be part monkey or squirrel – creative and always entertaining with tricks and toys.

Javanese also come in seal, blue, chocolate and lilac point colors similar to the Siamese and Balinese. However, these colors are not eligible for championship competion in CFA. As with the Balinese, the foremost Javanese breeders use Siamese and Colorpoints in their breeding programs producing “variants” that might look like Siamese or Colorpoints. The coats have a richer feel than that of a true shorthair. Because of the number of genetic variables, the kittens that are marked like Siamese are almost always sold as pets while those that are marked like Colorpoints are used within our breeding programs.

Pricing on Javanese usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National or Regional winning parentage (NW or RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/ premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: Kris Willison

Last Updated: Wednesday, September 02, 2009

Taken from: http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/javanese.html

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Pictured: Second Best of Breed GC SONGGWANGSA OKAMEI, Silver Patterned Mi-Ke Japanese Bobtail – Longhair Division Female .Photo: © Chanan

A cat with a raised paw beckons from the doorway. The cat is ceramic and the traditional Japanese symbol of good luck. They are modeled after the famous and favored bobtailed cats of Japan.

From written records it seems certain that the domestic cat first arrived in Japan from China or Korea at least one thousand years ago. The Japanese Bobtail breed has certainly existed in Japan for many centuries; it is featured in many ancient prints and paintings.

In 1968 the late Elizabeth Freret imported the first three Japanese Bobtails to the United States from Japan. In 1971 they were given provisional status in The Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) and were accepted for championship competition in 1976.

In 1993 the longhair Japanese Bobtail was accepted by CFA for championship competition. Mrs. Betty O’Brien, who judged the first CFA show in Japan in 1968, was deeply impressed by a longhaired mi-ke owned by Mrs. Kiyoko Tanaka which was exhibited at the show. The longhair Japanese Bobtail has existed for centuries in the orient as have the shorthairs.

A large painting from the 15th century hangs in the Freer Gallery of Art in the Smithsonian Institute in Washington DC, showing two lovely longhaired Japanese Bobtails. Their coats are parted neatly down the back and their tails are large and plumey. The longhair Japanese Bobtail exhibits all the same characteristics as the shorthair Bobtail.

Japanese Bobtails are strong and healthy cats. They usually have litters of three to four kittens that are extremely large for newborns. Compared to other breeds, they are active earlier, walk earlier and start getting into trouble earlier. This breed has a low kitten mortality rate and high disease resistance. Kittens are never born tailless, nor are they born with full tails. They are active, intelligent, talkative cats. Their soft voices are capable of nearly a whole scale of tones; some people say they sing. Since they adore human companionship they almost always speak when spoken to.

They like to carry things in their mouths, and most enjoy a good game of fetch. Masters of the pounce, these cats love to ride on shoulders. They are good travelers. They don’t panic at shows or strange hotel rooms, they adjust to dogs and other animals, and are especially good with children.

The Japanese Bobtail is a natural breed and does indeed come from Japan; all CFA registered cats can be traced back to the original imports. Any color except the Siamese pattern or Abyssinian type agouti is permitted, the most popular colors are the mi-ke and those colors that can be used to create it: white, black, red, black and white, red and white, and tortoiseshell. Vividly contrasting colors and bold dramatic markings are preferred on the bi-colors.

The tail is unique not only to the breed, but to each individual cat. Like our finger prints, no two tails are ever alike. The tail must be clearly visible and is composed of one or more curves, angles, or kinks or any combination thereof. The furthest extension of the tail bone from the body should be no longer than three inches. The direction in which the tail is carried is not important. The tail may be flexible or rigid and should be of a size and shape that harmonizes with the rest of the cat. The genetic factor which created the Japanese Bobtail is completely different from the Manx, a naturally tailless cat. Unlike the Manx, it is due to recessive genes and breeds true. The two breeds are not related in any way. Not only are their tails different, but the body types are completely opposite.

Pricing on Japanese Bobtails usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National or Regional winning parentage (NW or RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

There are CFA clubs devoted to the promotion, protection and preservation of the Japanese Bobtail breed. For more information, please send inquiries to CFA, PO Box 1005, Manasquan NJ 08736-0805.

Text: Dee Hinkle
Last Updated: Friday, July 24, 2009

Taken from: http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/japanese.html

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Pictured: Third Best of Breed GC, RW SOESTHILL I WALK THE LINE, Havana Brown Male
Photo: © Preston Smith Photography

In terms of history, the Havana Brown is a hybrid or man-made breed. This delightful self-chocolate cat is the result of carefully planned breeding for a specific genetic design. Documentation indicates that self-brown Siamesetype cats existed in England and Europe in the late 1800’s. The Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th Edition, mentions a “wholly chocolate-coloured strain of Siamese.” One name given to these self-brown cats was “Swiss Mountain Cat.”

In the 1920’s, the Siamese Cat Club of Britain discouraged the breeding of any “but blue-eyed Siamese” and the breed was abandoned. In the early 1950’s, a group of English breeders worked together to produce a self-brown cat. The cats used were a black domestic and a seal or chocolate point Siamese. Reportedly, an occasional Russian Blue was also used. The name Havana Brown was used for the first time to describe the color genetics for self-browns.

The first Havana Brown was imported into North America in the mid 1950’s. The breed was accepted for registration by CFA in 1959 and was granted Championship status in 1964. Records and old pedigrees reveal that some North American breeders introduced Russian Blues and Siamese into their early breeding programs. This practice came to an end when the breed was closed to outcross breeding in 1974.

In England, the Havana has tended to follow the type of the Siamese and the word “brown” has been dropped from the breed name while breeders in North America have maintained the name and the look of the early imports. In 1998, in an effort to increase the gene pool, breeders received approval from CFA to open the breed to outcross breeding to unregistered black or blue domestic shorthairs or certain colors of Oriental Shorthairs. In 1999, approval was also received for the use of chocolate point or seal point Siamese with full Havana Browns. CFA’s 8th Best Cat in Championship for the 2004-2005 show season (the cat pictured on the front cover at the top of this pamphlet) is a product of the outcross program. This beautiful male, along with his achievement, is a true testament to the success of the program.

What makes a Havana Brown unique? The first thing an admirer notices is the glistening mahogany-toned glossy brown coat. The coat is smooth, lustrous, closelying and feels like a luxurious mink. A rich, evenly colored shade of warm chocolate brown tending more to redbrown is desirable. Their other incomparable feature is the distinctive head that is slightly longer than it is wide. In profile, the prominent broad nose has a definite stop at the eyes. A pronounced whisker pinch combined with the strong square chin forms a somewhat rounded muzzle. Viewed from above or felt with the fingertips, the pronounced break in the bone structure behind each whisker pad is evident in good specimens. The enticing green, oval-shaped eyes in combination with large, forward tilted ears contribute to their alert sweet expression.

Picking up a Havana Brown for the first time can be a surprising experience, as this lithe-looking cat weighs more than it appears. Its medium-sized body must be firm and muscular, exhibiting a sense of power, yet also exhibit elegance and gracefulness. Males tend to be larger than their female counterparts, usually weighing around eight to ten pounds, while the females average six to eight.

Several theories exist as to how the breed got its name. Some historians insist it was named after the rabbit of the same color; however, most Havana Brown fans choose to believe that the breed name refers to the color of a fine Havana cigar.

Kittens are born brown, all brown. Ghost tabby markings are allowed in kittens; however, the ideal is a solid color coat free of any markings whatsoever. Whiskers must be brown to complement the coat color.

The Havana Brown has a charming, playful manner and a soft, intimate voice. They often extend a paw as a means of contact or attempt to gain the attention of passersby as well as using their paws to investigate curiosities by touching and feeling. A people-oriented breed, they quietly demand human companionship and adapt to most situations. This is the perfect cat for the person who wants a sociable, affectionate and intelligent feline friend. A cat who is as sweet in appearance and color as…chocolate.

Pricing on Havana Browns usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National or Regional winning parentage (NW or RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: Norma Placchi

Last Updated: Friday, June 12, 2009

Taken from: http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/havana.html

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