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Archive for the ‘Jenis-jenis kucing menurut CFA’ Category

Our new blog: ………….. http://www.lykasal.com/

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The Siberian….

Did you know that Russian President Gorbachov had a Siberian named Murat, and also that Dmitry Medvedev, the current President of Russia, has a colorpoint Siberian?

Pamela Martin, Siberian Breed Council Secretary, writes about this Russian treasure.

The photo here is of GC Solacefarm Timosha Yuriovich.

Source: CFA’s Monthly eNewsletter, March 2011

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Regal blue coat with a silver sheen, and green, green eyes. A head that has “seven planes” to it. What cat is this? Well, it’s the Russian Blue.

Also known as the “Archangel Cat”, the aristocratic Russian Blue is the gem of the feline world. Their short, dense silver-tipped blue fur glistens and shimmers in the light as they move providing an elegant setting for their glowing emerald green eyes. Is it any wonder they are rumored to have been the pets of the Russian Czars and a favorite of Queen Victoria? Their beautiful faces have an enigmatic smile as they survey their dominion with satisfaction. They are a medium-sized cat with fine boning and large, flared ears all in wonderful harmony. Sheer elegance combined with intelligence make this breed a winner in the show ring and in the home.

TICA news letter, Thursday, March 17, 2011

General Description

The aristocratic Russian Blue is the gem of the feline world. Their short, dense silver-tipped blue fur glistens and shimmers in the light as they move providing an elegant setting for their glowing emerald green eyes. Is it it any wonder they are rumored to have been the pets of the Russian Czars and a favorite of Queen Victoria? Their beautiful faces have an enigmatic smile as they survey their dominion with satisfaction. They are a medium sized cat with fine boning and large, flared ears all in wonderful harmony. Sheer elegance combined with intelligence make this breed a winner in the show ring and in the home.

History

Russian Blues are also known as the Archangel cats. While their silver tipping and green eyes certainly make them look like angels, the Archangel name was given to them after their point of origin–the Russian port of Arkhangelsk on the White Sea about 150 miles south of the Arctic Circle. The cats boarded the boats with the sailors and came to other parts of Europe. The first cat shows in England in the 1880s included Russian Blues. For a while, all blue shorthaired cats competed in the same class however in 1912 the distinctive cats from Arkhangelsk with their large eyes and ears were assigned their own class called the Foreign Blue.

The war had an impact on cat breeding and on the Russian Blue cats. After the war, breeders sought to revive their lines and outcrossed to cats that resembled the Russian cats. Some English breeders chose to use the blue British Shorthair to ensure they kept the pale plush coat. Other breeders chose to use blue point Siamese to ensure they kept the elegant foreign body with its long fine legs and to preserve the distinctive head with its large ears and eyes. The Scandinavian breeders were also working with outcross cats using Siamese and a blue cat from Finland but their cats had short tight dark coats and magnificent emerald green eyes set like jewels in the triangular head. Russian Blues came to North America in the early 1900s however serious breeding programs began much later. The North American breeders imported cats from both England and Scandinavia and worked to combine the best features of each into today’s modern Russian Blue. Today’s Russian Blue has emerald eyes and a pale blue coat frosted with silver and the angelic smile that is a distinguishing feature of the breed.

Personality

The elegant, aristocratic Russian Blue has a keen intellect that makes it an engaging companion. The Russian Blue surveys a situation before diving in and so rarely gets itself into a difficult situation – it observes people to determine if they are worthy of its companionship. Sometimes people see this behavior as shy or aloof when it is really a reserve with strangers until it has fully assessed them. Once the Russian Blue decides you are worthy of its attention, it is extremely affectionate and expects your loving attention to all its needs. They will teach you how to play Fetch – bringing you their toy and demanding you throw it for them! Their quick intelligence has them learning all the time – and they will watch you until they figure out how to open that container containing their favorite treats! While they are generally quiet cats, they will talk to you if you talk to them and can develop a large vocabulary. They are playful, loving companions that get along well with children and other pets. They are a great choice for the modern family because they are content with their own company while you are out and about but delighted to spend time playing or curled in your lap when you get home.

Traits

Russian Blues come in one coat color – Blue. And one coat length – Short. It is their short, dense, bright blue coat tipped with silver that has been a hallmark of the breed for more than a century. The silvery tip to the hairs reflects the light and the coat shimmers like moire silk as the cat moves. Watching a Russian Blue moving in sunlight is like watching poetry in motion! The dense coat stands out from the body and you can draw patterns in the coat that will stay until you smooth them out again.

The elegant silver setting is one set to house priceless jewels – and those jewels are the glowing emeralds that serve as eyes in these magnificent cats. The deep, vivid green eyes engage your attention and draw you deep into their depths. The enigmatic smile hovers on the face as the cat watches you entranced with its regal bearing.

The Russian Blue is a graceful cat with a medium-sized foreign body that is lithe and muscular. The long legs are fine boned and the cat seems to know it as it often poses sitting high with feet crossed in a pose that accentuates the line of the cat.

The head is a wedge with 7 angular planes that create a pleasing look. The characteristic smile is emphasized by the crossing of the muzzle and cheekbone planes. The wide, high cheekbones frame the large, almost round emerald eye. The large, flared ears frame the exquisite face providing a pleasing balance.

All together the straight lines and graceful presence of the Russian Blue give it an aristocratic appearance that is then regally cloaked in the blue coat shimmering with silver and the expressive emerald green eyes

Source: http://www.tica.org/public/breeds/rb/intro.php

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At the Executive Board Meeting earlier this month the Burmilla was accepted for Registration and the RagaMuffins were advanced to Championship.
The Burmilla is a man-made breed originating in the UK approximately 25 years ago from an accidental breeding of a Chinchilla Silver male Persian to a Burmese female. The resulting kittens were so attractive that the owner decided to embark upon a breeding program. Blending these two breeds together produces cats that are impish and mishievous, but quiet and gentle, a sweet natured cat that is people oriented and loving. The Burmilla is a small to medium sized cat. The overall look should be somewhat like a foreign Burmese but with a sweeter, more open look. The coat color is tipped / shaded in a number of colors. Allowable outcrosses are Chinchilla Persian (no CPCs) and European Burmese. They come in both longhair and shorthair. 

The RagaMuffin was in CFA Miscellaneous status for six years and in Provisional status for two years and as of May 1st it will compete in the Championship class. The overall impression of the RagaMuffin should be one of sweetness and robust health. They are a large cat with substantial bone structure. The large, expressive eyes strongly contribute to the overall sweet look.

The only extremes in this cat are large size, large expressive eyes and docile nature. RagaMuffins come in all coat colors and patterns, with the pointed and pointed with white colors being registered by CFA but not shown.

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Pictured: Third Best of Breed GC RACING RAT RAPTURE, Red Tabby-White Turkish Van Female . Photo: ©

The cat known in the United States as the Turkish Van is a rare and ancient breed that developed in central and southwest Asia, which today encompasses the countries of Iran, Iraq, southwest Soviet Union and eastern Turkey. “Van” is a common term in the region that has been given to a number of towns, villages and even a lake – Lake Van – so it is no surprise that the uniquely patterned cat native to the region was named the “Vancat” by the residents. They were first brought to England in 1955 as the Turkish cats, but this was later changed to Turkish Van to avoid confusion with the Turkish Angora. Although the breed has an ancient lineage, the Turkish Van is a relative newcomer to the United States, arriving in 1982. They are considered regional treasures in their homeland, and are not readily available for export to other countries. Even in areas where the breed has been known for centuries, they are still relatively rare.

The breed was first brought into Europe from the Middle East by returning crusaders, and has been known by a variety of names over the centuries such as the white ringtail and the Russian longhair. A common misconception is that the Turkish Van is simply a color variation of the better known Turkish Angora. In reality, the Van and the Angora are distinct breeds that developed in geographically distant regions of Turkey. When seen together, the differences in type, size, boning and coat are readily apparent.

The coloration of the Turkish Van, which is considered by many to be the original breed to carry the piebald gene, calls for a white, semi-longhaired cat with colored markings restricted primarily to the head and tail. Other piebald cats that have been selectively bred for many generations to achieve similar markings are said to be “van-patterned” after the breed that originally sported it. The coat lacks an undercoat and has a very unique cashmere-like texture that makes it water-resistant. This brings us to another interesting feature of this breed – they love water and in their native region they have been termed “the Swimming Cats.”

The Turkish Van takes three to five years to reach full maturity and is a large and agile cat of substantial strength. They are very intelligent as well as curious and make very rewarding companions in the right home. The breed is a healthy one and the unique coat does not lend itself to matting, so they require little grooming.

Pricing on Turkish Vans usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National or Regional winning parentage (NW or RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: Dei von Saxe-Coburg
Last Updated: Monday, June 15, 2009

Taken from: http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/turkish-van.html

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Pictured: Best of Breed GC, BW, NW SINEND’S DANCE ANYWAY OF SADAKAT, Blue-Eyed White Turkish Angora Male . Photo: © Preston Smith Phorography

One of the most outgoing and affectionate of all cat breeds, the rare and beautiful Turkish Angora has a fascinating history and is considered a national treasure in its native land. Many Turkish Angora owners in the United Stated consider their cats a treasure as well! Turks are not only intelligent, but extremely adaptable, loving and playful, which makes them an excellent choice for families with young children, and lively companions for senior adults. They readily accept dogs and other animals, but their assertive natures often make them the “alpha” pet in the household.

Elegant, finely-boned creatures, Turkish Angoras are graceful, energetic and usually the first to welcome visitors into your home. It is also not unusual for a pet Turk to act as the “host” at a party or other gathering, inspecting and interacting with every guest. It is no wonder that they are often considered “dog-like!”

The Turkish Angora’s soft, silky coat rarely mats and requires only minimal grooming. Most breeders recommend combing once or twice a week with a fine-toothed comb or slicker brush to remove excess hair and keep the coat looking and feeling its best. Like all long-haired breeds, they lose some coat during the summer months, when more frequent combing may be needed to prevent hairballs.

Most likely, the breed originated in the mountainous regions of Turkey, where it developed an unusually soft, medium-long coat for protection against the harsh winters. Possibly it evolved from the Manul cat, a small feline domesticated by the Tartars. This pure, natural breed can trace its written history as far back as 16th-century France. However, in the early 1900s, it was used indiscriminately in Persian breeding programs and virtually disappeared as a separate breed. For many years, all longhaired cats were referred to simply as “Angoras.”

Fortunately for cat lovers, controlled breeding programs had been set up in Turkey to preserve this living treasure. There, in the 1950s, at the Ankara Zoo, the Turkish Angora was discovered by American servicemen and re-introduced to the cat fancy. All Turkish Angoras registered by CFA must be able to trace their ancestry back to Turkey.

Although the first import on record arrived in the U.S. in 1954, it was not until the mid-1960s that the breed became numerous enough to seek recognition from CFA. White Turkish Angoras were accepted for registration in 1968, for Provisional Breed competition in 1970, and for Champion-ship competition in 1972. The first CFA grand champion, GC NoRuz Kristal of Azima, came in 1976. However, it took another two years before colored Turkish Angoras were permitted to compete in Championship with their all-white siblings.

While whites are still very popular today, Turkish Angora breeders have focused increasingly on colored cats. More and more people are realizing how lovely these lithe, elegant creatures look in other colors. At a CFA show today you might see these cats in other solid colors, such as black, blue, red and cream; in tortoiseshell or blue-cream; in classic, mackerel and spotted tabbies of many colors; and bi-colored cats in any of these colors with white. In recent years, many breeders have begun working with smoke and shaded colors as well. Any shade and pattern, except those that denote hybridization (such as lavender, chocolate or the pointed pattern) is accepted for CFA registration.

Pricing on Turkish Angoras usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National, National Breed and/or Regional winning parentage (NW, BW, RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life. Colors: a wide array of colors in the solid, shaded, smoke, tabby, bi-color and parti-color patterns.

Text: B. Iris Tanner
Last Updated: Monday, June 22, 2009

Taken from: http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/turkish-angora.html

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Pictured: Third Best of Breed GC, RW PENDRAGON JOHNNYS SNOW ANGEL, Champagne Point Tonkinese Female .Photo: © Chanan

The Tonkinese blends the best features of its ancestors into one beautiful, medium-sized cat that is remarkably dense and muscular. Whether appearing in the coat pattern of its Burmese predecessor, with sparkling gold-green eyes, the pointed pattern of its Siamese ancestor, with glittering blue eyes, or the “mink” coat pattern seen in the show ring, with its unique aqua eyes, the Tonkinese is an intelligent, gregarious cat with a sense of humor. These cats are firmly convinced that humans were put on earth to love them; these are the cats that know they belong. They purred their way through seven years and four presentations to the board of directors of The Cat Fanciers’ Association in their pursuit of championship status, achieving their goal in 1984. Although new to modern competition, this is the same breed depicted in “The Cat-Book Poems of Siam” during the Ayudha Period (1358-1767), and imported to England in the early 1800s as “Chocolate Siamese.” In the United States, Tonkinese and Burmese can trace their beginnings back to Wong Mau, a small walnut colored cat imported to California by Dr. Joseph Thompson in 1930.

The colorful personality of the Tonkinese make them ideal companions. They will take possession of your lap and shoulder, and they will supervise your activities. They are warm and loving, highly intelligent, with an incredible memory and senses that are akin to radar. They are strong willed, and their humans are wise to use persistent persuasion in training them. They are naturals at inventing and playing games, using favorite toys to play fetch, and delighting in games of tag with each other. Of course hide ‘n seek is a favorite game, which they play with humans as well as other Tonks. They become your “door greeter” and will happily entertain your guests. They have been described by enthusiastic owners as part puppy (following their owner around the house), part monkey (their “acrobatics” are legend!), and can sound like an elephant running through your house when they choose. In short: they quickly take over and run your house and your life! Their affectionate ways are impossible to ignore, and they quickly endear themselves to family and visitors.

Caring for Tonkinese is as easy as feeding a well-balanced feline diet, clipping their nails weekly (providing a scratching post and insisting they use it is also imperative), using a rubber brush to groom them, and of course the all important visit to the vet for check-ups and inoculations. These are indoor only cats, and a thorough inspection of your home prior to your Tonks’ arrival, to make certain screens and doors are secured, will help insure they remain indoors. “Cat proofing” your home, much as you would for a two-year old human on the loose, is bound to save you frustration. Toys and an interesting cat tree will help keep them occupied when you have other things to do besides playing with your Tonk. Working humans find two Tonks will keep each other company as well as lessen the mischief one bored Tonk can get into.

Tonks wear a rainbow of colors, and no matter which color in whatever coat pattern you may choose, be assured you are joining an enthusiastic fan club of admirers of this breed. You are about to embark on the most joyful experience of your life — enjoy!

Pricing on Tonkinese usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National or Regional winning parentage (NW or RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make kittens available between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

Text: Alden & Mary Mosshammer
Last Updated: Monday, June 15, 2009

Taken from: http://www.cfa.org/breeds/profiles/tonkinese.html

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